Volvo's electric C30 and the One Tonne Life project

20 January 2011

How low can you go? When it comes to carbon emissions, one brave family in Sweden is about to find out.

The willing victims in the One Tonne Life experiment are the Lindell family from Hässelby near Stockholm in Sweden. Nils Lindell, his wife Alicja and their two teenage children Hannah and Jonathan, will each try to live a bearable life while cutting their carbon dioxide emissions by as much as seven eighths – to just one tonne per person per year.

The Lindells were selected from more than 50 volunteer families, and yesterday they moved into a purpose-built wooden eco house – waving goodbye to their 1970s brick and concrete home as well as their pair of old petrol Renault Scénics. They get, by way of replacement, a single battery-powered Volvo C30 Electric.

I wasn’t able to make it to Sweden to quiz Volvo or the family directly, but via the miracle of email (and Volvo’s PR department) I did send some questions for them to answer. You can see the results below in this short video:

2 comments:

John said...

It is interesting that the one tonne per year of CO2 takes into account the lifecycle emissions of the families actions. For example, the building process of the house and the manufacture of the vehicle and its electricity are all factored into the calculations.

This shows that the research is thorough and valuable. Nice project!

catcompare said...

The first electric car was 1890, over 120 years later we are still developing. Fingers crossed, it would make a big difference to city life.

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